The Brand Called YOU!

The Brand Called YOU!

In my most recent blog http://bbtaylor-books.co.uk/who-are-you/ I wrote about having a voice. One that is truly yours and tells the story only you were meant to tell. But with writing any book, story, poem or creating any illustrations, it’s only the beginning.   What most people don’t realise is that being an author or an illustrator in this day and age is the same as having your own business, the only difference the product you are selling is yourself. Without you the words and illustrations would not exist and therefore the business wouldn’t either. It doesn’t matter whether you’re traditionally published or self published the principles are the same and the hard work often begins after you’ve got your book in your hands.   And just as with every good book, every successful business has that all important hook. That brand that everyone identifies them with. For creatives a brand can be a vital way to get their work noticed, to stand out in a crowd. In a modern world where everything is more accessible now than ever, getting your book out there and recognised can seem like a daunting challenge. It’s very easy to fade into the background, if you allow yourself to.   So then what do we mean by a brand? A brand can be many things. A look, a style, a catchphrase. Something that people can immediately identify as you and connect to your work.   Take the very talented Chris Riddell for example, his brand is his style of illustrating. A distinct look that is easily recognisable, and attributed to both him and his work....

Who Are You?

In a world filled with icons and idols, it’s very easy to be swept up in the idea or fantasy of wanting to be your hero. Just like when we were children playing pretend and for writers it can be just the same.   Everyone wishes for that fairy tale story of being discovered as the next big thing and many of us aspire to reach those pedestals that we put our heroes on. For lots of writers it’s that saying, ‘oh you could be the next J.k’  that excites them and puts stars of hope in their eyes. Don’t get me wrong I don’t think any of us could ever complain at the opportunity to be that successful, but is there a worry of loosing ourselves whilst trying to be someone else. I just like other writers have my idols, Cliff McNish, Lian Hearn and Terry Pratchett were some of my literary heroes who cemented my love of books, and I was lucky enough to meet two out of the three, who were just as amazing in the flesh as they were in their words. But could I create a villain as terrifying as Dragwena in Doomspell, or a character as lovable as Death in Mort, or even craft as stunning a tale as Across the Nightingale Floor? I think the question should more be, not could I recreate the voice of another author but what story was I born to tell with my own voice instead? I am neither as funny as Pratchett, as dramatic as McNish or as eloquent as Hearn, but I am something different. I...